Articles

  • With their signature stacks of thirteen Hyperkites pulling 40’ long tails, The Bay Area Sundowners have the distinction of being one of the oldest and most entertaining kite flying teams in the world today.
  • ABOUT KIYO HASHIMOTO The Japan Kite Association lost our oldest member during this New Year holiday season. It was Kiyo Hashimoto, the wife of Teizo Hashimoto, who was a worldly, well known Edo kite maker. Kiyo passed away on January 5th, 2009, right before her 106th birthday.
  • I have loved books since the age of 11. Firstly as a means of learning and then later as an art form. My first contact with books arose from the necessity of learning English as a second language and then much later, as a teacher, books in turn became an essential part of my job. As an adult, my passion for Asian arts made me purchase a variety of beautifully illustrated books to further my knowledge about artworks that particularly interested me. However, it was the world of Japanese kites that led me directly to the Japanese picture book.
  • Japan is a long island from north to south. There are different kite cultures within the country, and each culture adopts their geographical condition beautifully. Is there any country other than Japan that has such diverse kite cultures in one country?
  • Long ago in 1962, David Kung published a charming, limited edition book, Japanese Kites: A Vanishing Art, which drew attention to the exquisite work of elderly Japanese kite makers, some of whom had embarked upon their kite-making careers at the turn of the 19th into the 20th centuries. Scott Skinner first introduced me to this book. Kung expressed concern that the traditional craft of the Japanese kite maker might eventually die out with its then-aging practitioners.
  • A sugoroku is a Japanese woodblock print meant to be used as a game board. They were usually produced to be New Year’s gifts and depicted popular subjects to make them appealing to parents and children: scenes from the Tokaido Road, views of Mt. Fuji, neighborhood maps of old Edo districts, and so forth. The game was much like “Chutes and Ladders” with a die to send players to sugoroku squares on which instructions would send them forward or back.
  • SCOTT: Hui Press director Paul Mullowney made his staff and studio space available to us, as well as to Nobuhiko Yoshizumi, for the duration of the two-week program. Yoshizumisan led children’s workshops for the first full week in Maui, while Susan planned her approach for her kites and I started framing artists’ kites for exhibition.
  • Logan Airport in Billings, Montana, is the scene of a wonderful exhibition of kites, on view through March of next year. As proof that the East, in this case Japan's Kumamota state, and the West, represented by host Montana, do after all meet despite the Kipling injunction, and exhibition titled Sky, Wind and World has been mounted in the air facility. Two million passengers are expected to view it. Kumamota and Montana are sister states and this exhibit is the latest manifestation of their friendly partnership.
  • Because of Indonesia's current problems, the decision to hold the festival in the beautiful town of Sanur, Bali could not be made until two weeks before the starting date. At such short notice, less than a dozen international participants were able to join in the mid-year event. Guests came from Brunei, Singapore, Japan, France, Austria, Holland, and the U.S. Bali itself was more than well represented.
  • Having studied the "Pictures for the Sky" catalogue, I found the reality of the large exhibition surprising. What you don't get from looking at the book is scale. The kites in the exhibit are generally quite big. You don't get to see kites as big in Japan very often. Longing to see the exhibit for years, I caught up with it finally in Luxembourg last year, where the organizer, Dr.Paul Eubel, is directing the Goethe Institute-Germany's cultural equivalent of the United States Information Agency.