Articles

  • It’s always hard to say goodbye to a close friend as they complete life’s journey and pass on. For our friend Corey Jensen we find ourselves confronting a huge void upon his passing. He was a man of such personality, warmth, kindness, and compassion, that to define his effects on our lives is quite overwhelming. As time goes by, we’ll all carry special traits, trinkets, and memories given to us by “the Corey Lama.”
  • The Drachen Foundation encouraged us to share how University Child Development School (UCDS) used kites in our Art, Design & Technology, and Science classrooms. We reflected on how kites connected ideas and concepts across the school curriculum.
  • It was standing room only. Surrounded by kites from artists around the world, the crowd filled the seats of The Studio@620 in St. Petersburg, Florida to hear artist Enrique Cay speak of his art and experience with the giant kites of Guatemala. His paintings depict the experience of kiting in Guatemalan culture. With the help of an interpreter, Enrique was able to explain kiting’s connection to the Day of the Dead celebration and its reflection in his art.
  • I did an Internet search for Clawson Machine Co. – don’t ask why, you’ll see that I had my reasons – and found a number of interesting patents from the late 1800s: a coin-controlled, musical weighing machine (US381338, 1888), a coin-controlled air-pump-operating mechanism (US619279, 1899), and the one that has appeared to keep the company in business, the “machine for shaving ice” (US387861, 1888). Established in 1883, Clawson Machine Co.
  • I don’t know how this understated paperback found its way to my bookshelf. I’ve walked into some great bookstores in every part of the country, including Powell’s in Portland, Tattered Cover in Denver, and Ken Sander’s Rare Books in Salt Lake City, to name a few. My memory is fuzzy, but More Sky might have been a Ken Sanders purchase, and I’m surprised and impressed every time I take it off the shelf and leaf through its pages.
  • In the spirit of supporting a new art gallery venture in the town of Tieton, Washington, the Drachen Foundation became very excited about the idea of putting together the first contemporary art kite exhibit to raise funds for the Highland Food Bank.
  • Introduction by Scott Skinner
  • In man’s search for usable energy, the journey started with the first spark that led to harnessing fire, and continues toward the hope of nuclear fusion power in the future. Here I’d like to draw from that history and consider how kites may be on the verge of becoming a small part of that story.
  • Editor’s Note: This tribute to Charlie Sotich captures the importance of the community of kiting. Drachen was honored to work with Marla and Ron Miller to help preserve Charlie’s legacy for generations to come. Examples of his work can be seen at www.drachen.org. Donate to the “Thank You Charlie” Program at www.gofundme.com/ThankYouCharlie. More information about the program should be directed to Marla Miller at kytpepl2@aol.com. Upload your photos of Charlie’s kites to our website at www.drachen.org.
  • You make your residence in Boulder, Colorado. How did you get there, and what’s a day like in Boulder? I moved to Boulder in 1992 when I was hired in a tenure track position in the photography area of the art department at the University of Colorado at Boulder. I had been teaching for about 18 years at that point at a number of universities around the U.S. but could never find a place to stay. I wanted to be in the west and it worked out.