Articles

  • A FASCINATION WITH FLIGHT: GETTING TO KNOW THE MANY FACETS OF MARK REED Everyone’s personal history can either be crafted by the individual or someone else. I like the idea of having it crafted by someone else, as it creates a larger circle of interest, liberal interpretation, and “the thing that makes one a legend.” In this Discourse, I thought it would be fun to do an article that continues the 20th anniversary theme. I looked around in the kite industry, and who did I find?
  • It’s time to reflect on twenty years of the Drachen Foundation and talk about some of the moments that have made us proud. Before doing that, let me take a moment to thank three people who made the Foundation what it is. First, my wife Sherry, who agreed so many years ago to let me pursue this passion and then participated in funding the organization through its history. Sherry was nice enough to let me travel the globe while she managed kids, dogs, and household emergencies. Without Sherry’s support, the Drachen Foundation would have remained nothing but a dream.
  • Like all stories, there is a beginning and an end. This one has a definite beginning, and hopefully there is no end. In our 20th year anniversary, we wanted to celebrate those things in our history which made Drachen special. For me, it is one person, Scott Skinner.
  • A hobby and sport in the West and a religious celebration in the East, kiting became international in the last two decades through increased global travel and because the internet made verbal connections fast and easy. Intelligent patronage by the Drachen Foundation helped these developments significantly.
  • I was trained to be an observer of life; to find those incidents and experiences that influence people to the point of action. This delightful blog of how this kite came to be is the direct result of individuals who were inspired by something they saw; a wonderful kite by Texas Tech University art educator and artist Betty Street. Betty’s art was done with the passion of her past, patchwork quilting and textiles, using these motifs to make kites that flew.
  •  My fascination with kites stems from the way they capture light as they move in the wind. My own work has developed primarily in handmade paper, and I have yet to design my own kite, but I recently found a book on my shelf that I’d had since childhood called “Drachen Basteln” (Craft Kites) which I must have purchased or been gifted when my family lived in Germany for a year when I was sixteen.
  •  Introduction by Ali Fujino
  • When you combine a love for nineteenth-century literature with a love for kites, some interesting things happen. As I began researching nineteenth-century kite literature, I realized that there was preciously little material on the subject, even though nineteenth-century stories involving kites abounded.
  •  Tom Van Sant is that type of artist. Professionally trained he has been on the cutting edge of art and design for decades. Like the masters, he works in a way that incorporates everything in his life into his art — his personal life, his professional and technical skills and his passion to know about the world in which he lives.
  • The walk up to Pat Hammond’s house is just as I remember it, a jungle of plants under a canopy of arching oak trees. Statues of lambs carved in stone guard the path leading to her home. At the door, I am greeted by a set of numbers written in rusty old chains laid out on the ground: 3 1 4 1 5 9 2 6 5. It’s a chain letter. Literally.