Articles

  • Sumatra's jungle foliage stayed with us right up to the village of Mutun's narrow, white sand beach.
  • William Abner Eddy of Bayonne, New Jersey is credited with creating the popular diamond-shaped, tail-less kite that is recognized around the world.
  • Because of Indonesia's current problems, the decision to hold the festival in the beautiful town of Sanur, Bali could not be made until two weeks before the starting date. At such short notice, less than a dozen international participants were able to join in the mid-year event. Guests came from Brunei, Singapore, Japan, France, Austria, Holland, and the U.S. Bali itself was more than well represented.
  • The use of kite to catch fish is very old technique, possibly dating back to the Stone Age, but can still be seen in selected regions of Southeast Asia where it remains a daily activity. Kite fishing occurs across 65 degrees of longitude, from Singapore and Java in the west to the Santa Cruz islands near the Solomons in the east, and it straddles the equator over that length of large and small islands.
  • A longtime expatriate American, Bauman manages a geophysical services group for a firm in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. His group does near surface work and focuses on exploring for water and studying contamination sites. It involves itself as well in archeology, engineering, and the search for resources. Originally from Boston, Bauman has degrees from Princeton and the University of Waterloo in Ontario. In recent years he has frequently used kite aerial photography in archeological work and in the study of industrial areas with stressed vegetation.
  • Wolfgang Bieck and wife Mona Hie, of Bad Bevensen, Germany, made a second expedition to Muna island in Indonesia to more closely examine the cave painting of a man flying a kite that has now been viewed and photographed by several groups. The issue is age. Is the painting ancient----if so it may trump the Chinese claim to having invented the kite----or is it a modern day fake, as some suspect?
  • On a visit to the west coast of Java some years ago, Philippe Cottenceau of the French kite association Au fil des Vents saw a traditional, probably quite ancient use of a kite not many Westerners have reported on. He saw a kite being used to catch food. Bats, to be precise. The scene was the village of Pangandaran, west of Jakarta, where an annual international kite festival is held.
  • Reflecting a resurgence of interest in traditional culture, eight of the countries that make up the ASEAN confederation have taken the first step in establishing a kite council. ASEAN stands for Association of South East Asian Nations and is a trade group with sports and cultural components. Formation of a pro tem working committee to organize the council occurred at the recent Pasir Gudang festival in Johor, Malaysia.
  • Endang W. Puspoyo of Jakarta, Indonesia, was attracted to kites by their beauty many years ago. She soon began making and flying her own, then took to collecting them. She helped organize the first international festival in Jakarta in l993, and has been a force in Indonesian kiting ever since. With a powerful cabinet minister husband supporting her, she has now opened her own museum, actually a complex of found old buildings and new construction. The museum is 15 miles from downtown Jakarta
  • The hope that a cave painting in Indonesia might shed light on the antiquity of the kite globally (Drachen Journal No. 10, Page 18) has been stalled, at least for the time being. What is needed is scientific verification of age, a possibly complicated and expensive matter, although dating possibilities are numerous and wide-ranging.