Articles

  • The dragon is made thus: Make a quadrangle of the small pieces of reeds, that the length may be to the breadth, one and half in proportion. Put in two diameters on the opposite parts or angles, where they cut on the other. Bind it with a small cord, and of the same bigness. Let it be joined with two others that proceed from the heads of the engine. Then, cover it with paper or thin linen, that there be no burden to weigh upon it.
  • Thirty five kite enthusiasts, many with years of kite flying and kite making behind them, were carried back in time by the historical kite experts at The Drachen Foundation’s first historical kite gathering in Haltern, Germany. Organized on site by Achim and Sabine Kinter from nearby Gelsenkirchen, the participants were promised a look at historical documents, antique kites, and kite building techniques from 100 years ago.
  • Samuel Franklin Cody (no kin to Buffalo Bill) was a brash cowboy and Wild West showman whose outrageous feats on horseback paled next to his triumphs of self-promotion. That he went on to become a British aviation pioneer, buried at the age of 46 with pomp and circumstance in a British military cemetery, is a largely forgotten story carefully reconstructed in no-frills prose by Garry Jenkins, a London journalist. He does justice to a man whose ‘determination and dauntless courage’ were noted by no less than King George V.
  • Interest in the strange, wonderful life of aerial pioneer Samuel F. Cody has never waned since his death almost a century ago. Evidence for this can be found on the Internet where Jean Roberts, a foremost expert on Cody, has mounted an interesting and well illustrated web site: http:// www.sfcody.org.uk/.
  • Here is a meticulously produced large format volume that will be treasured by anyone interested in the magic of flight and the pioneer aeronauts who believed in their dreams. The aeronautical related items of art and artifacts——balloons, zeppelins, fanciful and practical airships, mainly—are drawn from more than 20,000 objects that reflect humanity’s vision of human flight as well as its fulfillment—from antiquity dating back 5,000 years to powered flight at the beginning of the 20th century.
  • The first-ever patent for a kite was issued in France on Sept. 27, 1800 to the Englishman George (Georges in French patent use) Pocock for one or more diamond-shaped kites designed to pull a carriage with four people. It was the 3,116th patent issued in France and was 66 years before the first American kite patent was issued, 82 years in Germany and 55 years in England. Also, it was 54 years before the next patent for a kite was issued in France.
  • The use of kites in scientific research is a recurring theme, so it came as no surprise that a 1909 Scientific American article on sounding apparatus included a box kite in its description. But a look at the title of the article provided a surprise. “Deep Sea Sounding Apparatus : Some Recent Improvements,” it read.
  • Werner Schmidt’s apotheosis came in l984 when he viewed a strange kite in a technology museum in Munich. It was a Grund Boxkite. “I still remember the moment I first saw it,” he says. “That’s how impressed I was.”
  • Connoisseurs agree Anke Sauer’s “Jack-in-the-box” foldup kite is one of the most exciting new kites of the last few years, but as to its generic category there is no consensus as yet.
  • Abstract: The use of large kites in ship propulsion has been getting a growing attention because of the urgent need to reduce the CO2 production and thus stop the use of fossil fuels. A novel application of ship propulsion by kites is proposed based on a Laddermill apparatus mounted on a ship. Such an apparatus consist of a winch, an electric motor/generator, a kite system (including launch and retrieval) and controlling electronics.