Articles

  • An industrial electronics engineer from Schlangen, Germany, Harald Prinzler took up KAP in the early 1990s and soon became a convert to Flow Forms as aerial platforms. He invented a variation of the Flow Form and has shared it worldwide via his Web site. Prinzler does not use direction control for his camera rig, preferring to use his imagination in pointing the camera. He says he likes it that way----more exciting
  • After almost 20 years of KAP and more than 6,000 images taken during that period, Andrea Casalboni, of Ravenna, Italy, remains partially unreconstructed. He uses digital for big format prints, but rejects the help of radio-controlled video in choosing when to shoot because he likes to imagine the shot he is making. “I have more feel for the subject that way,” he says. “My experience allows me to put the camera on the right point, while not disturbing the subject.
  • The Aerial Eye, an international journal for kite aerial photographers, published by the American Kitefliers Association l994-99. Useful science and art. All 18 issues, including invaluable index, are available on compact disk for $30 postpaid anywhere in the world. Contact Brooks Leffler at Post Office Box 34, Pacific Grove, CA 93050. “Under the editorship of Leffler, this magazine was so good,” comments expert Peter Bults, “it appears to have drained the worldwide KAP user community of ideas in its day and run out of material.”
  • Both of them earth science teachers at a state university in Kansas, James and Susan Aber are a husband-wife team that uses kite aerial photography for diverse educational, scientific, commercial, and esthetic purposes throughout the U.S. and in several countries of northern Europe. Devoted KAPers since 1996, the two have been using only high-resolution digital cameras since 2005. Their kites are large Rokkakus and Flow Forms.
  • 1858. Gaspard Felix Tournachon (a.k.a. Nadar) takes the first aerial photograph ever, from a balloon 262 feet in the air, over the Bievre Valley, near Paris. The shot is of such poor quality it cannot be reproduced. “A simple positive upon glass, made with detestable materials,” is Nadar’s characterization. But aerial photography is born. 1860. The first genuinely beautiful and sharply focused aerial photograph is taken by James Black from a balloon 1,200 feet above Boston.
  • A full time KAP professional, adventuresome “Nico” Chorier uses Montepellier, France, as home base but wanders the world plying his trade. He has been a particular success with his strangely wonderful closeup views of the landmark Taj Mahal, in Agra, India. They brought him a measure of fame and even some fortune. (His first attempt on the Taj got him arrested, on his second go round he was backed by the local government tourist agency.) Chorier has photographed whales in Baja, Mexico, festivals in Bali, an agricultural project in Brazil, archeological sites in France.
  • It might be better for me if I didn’t talk about this. It was a bad mistake, but on the other hand, maybe I can slip a bit of positive spin with this version.
  • Want to find out where the nearest kite shop in the U.S. is located? A great place to fly? A nearby kite club? WWW. Mapmuse.com is interactively mapping all three categories. They are works in progress and editorial contributions to them are invited…….Because certain types of kites, often Asian, are by tradition made with paper sails, interest in handmade paper has spread around the contemporary kite world. Anyone concerned to further his knowledge of this ancient craft is well advised to visit the Research Institute of Paper History and Technology, in Boston.
  • Istvan Bodoczky chose one of the worst years in the 20th century to be born--- -1943. Budapest was occupied by the Nazis and his family had lost home and fortune. Two years later things took a turn for the worse: the Russians arrived. His father, a judge, was forced to become a Communist to keep his job, and Istvan at one point was quizzed by police as to his father’s loyalty. Already carefully briefed by family, the boy said nothing.
  • The oldest known kite in the world has been added to the Peter Lynn collection. Lynn is the noted kite inventor and aerodynamical theorist living in Ashburton, New Zealand.